E-Mailed Invitations: Better Sidekick than Superhero.


A good friend called me the other day and asked if my wife and I were going to attend a fundraiser ‘gala’ for a local non-profit organization. I was on the board of this organization for a number of years and in addition to a substantial financial contribution, I also donated a great deal of time developing their brand identity and various marketing pieces.

My knee-jerk reaction to my friend’s question was fairly severe–in that I felt slighted, having never received an invitation. I know this because I have been granted a sensory gift. I can hear a mail truck from at least 4 miles away and ever since childhood, the shutting of the mailbox door causing me to spring into action! So, as the family’s snail-mail gatekeeper, I know for a fact that a gala invite had never touched down at the old homestead.

Feeling under-appreciated and disgruntled, I attempted to erase every mental fragment of this particular organization from my mind. But then…

It was brought to my attention that printed invitations had neither been printed or mailed. All correspondence had been done through e-mail! 

B-Z-Z-Z-Z!(ear-splitting wail of the marketing communications penalty buzzer)

Lets be completely serious. Despite being ultra-green and economical, the novelty of electronic messages evaporated several years ago.

My e-mail inbox has a leak so BIG, that six dozen, Hans Brinkers–would not be able to control the flow. 

As I constantly struggle to bring the inbox to ‘E’–even Gary Cooper would fall victim to the speed of my itchy trigger finger as it reaches for the ‘unsubscribe’ button. 


Click. Gone. Next!


In fact, I recently subscribed to a great new service, unroll.me, which bundles all of my non-personal e-mails into one bundle (my Daily Rollup), delivered once a day. 

The service also tracks e-mails that are not yet included in the digital package. For those, I have three choices:

  1. Ad to my Rollup.
  2. Keep in my Inbox.
  3. Unsubscribe.

I can now out-draw Mr. Cooper, with my left mouse hand–even while blind-folded.

Returning to the invitation, there is a very good chance that while trying this trick (opposite hand, vision-impaired), I accidentally unsubscribed from this list–never to be invited again.

So here is what I strongly recommend in terms of event invitations:

  1. Unless you are going to reach out personally to invitees–either eyeball to eyeball or by the telephone, a printed invitation is necessary.
  2. A post card is fine. Just be aware that post cards do tend to receive excessive punishment as they travel through the USPS meat grinder.
  3. In the case of the gala event (as described above), where tickets are a steep $75 each–a modest invitation mailed in an envelope meets the basic requirements of social grace. After all, you don’t expect me to show up in a sleeveless undershirt and cut-offs.
  4. From an inter-family communication standpoint–you can’t thumbtack an e-mail to the family bulletin board. E-mail and refrigerator doors refuse to socialize.

Unless your e-mail list is rock solid, an e-mailed invitation makes a much better sidekick than an invitation super hero. Because, if you are like me, my ‘UNSUBSCRIBE’ trigger finger–very seldom rests. – Doug.


E-Mailed Invitations: Better Sidekick than Superhero.


A good friend called me the other day and asked if my wife and I were going to attend a fundraiser ‘gala’ for a local non-profit organization. I was on the board of this organization for a number of years and in addition to a substantial financial contribution, I also donated a great deal of time developing their brand identity and various marketing pieces.

My knee-jerk reaction to my friend’s question was fairly severe–in that I felt slighted, having never received an invitation. I know this because I have been granted a sensory gift. I can hear a mail truck from at least 4 miles away and ever since childhood, the shutting of the mailbox door causing me to spring into action! So, as the family’s snail-mail gatekeeper, I know for a fact that a gala invite had never touched down at the old homestead.

Feeling under-appreciated and disgruntled, I attempted to erase every mental fragment of this particular organization from my mind. But then…

It was brought to my attention that printed invitations had neither been printed or mailed. All correspondence had been done through e-mail! 

B-Z-Z-Z-Z!(ear-splitting wail of the marketing communications penalty buzzer)

Lets be completely serious. Despite being ultra-green and economical, the novelty of electronic messages evaporated several years ago.

My e-mail inbox has a leak so BIG, that six dozen, Hans Brinkers–would not be able to control the flow. 

As I constantly struggle to bring the inbox to ‘E’–even Gary Cooper would fall victim to the speed of my itchy trigger finger as it reaches for the ‘unsubscribe’ button. 


Click. Gone. Next!


In fact, I recently subscribed to a great new service, unroll.me, which bundles all of my non-personal e-mails into one bundle (my Daily Rollup), delivered once a day. 

The service also tracks e-mails that are not yet included in the digital package. For those, I have three choices:

  1. Ad to my Rollup.
  2. Keep in my Inbox.
  3. Unsubscribe.

I can now out-draw Mr. Cooper, with my left mouse hand–even while blind-folded.

Returning to the invitation, there is a very good chance that while trying this trick (opposite hand, vision-impaired), I accidentally unsubscribed from this list–never to be invited again.

So here is what I strongly recommend in terms of event invitations:

  1. Unless you are going to reach out personally to invitees–either eyeball to eyeball or by the telephone, a printed invitation is necessary.
  2. A post card is fine. Just be aware that post cards do tend to receive excessive punishment as they travel through the USPS meat grinder.
  3. In the case of the gala event (as described above), where tickets are a steep $75 each–a modest invitation mailed in an envelope meets the basic requirements of social grace. After all, you don’t expect me to show up in a sleeveless undershirt and cut-offs.
  4. From an inter-family communication standpoint–you can’t thumbtack an e-mail to the family bulletin board. E-mail and refrigerator doors refuse to socialize.

Unless your e-mail list is rock solid, an e-mailed invitation makes a much better sidekick than an invitation super hero. Because, if you are like me, my ‘UNSUBSCRIBE’ trigger finger–very seldom rests. – Doug.


E-Mailed Invitations: Better Sidekick than Superhero.


A good friend called me the other day and asked if my wife and I were going to attend a fundraiser ‘gala’ for a local non-profit organization. I was on the board of this organization for a number of years and in addition to a substantial financial contribution, I also donated a great deal of time developing their brand identity and various marketing pieces.

My knee-jerk reaction to my friend’s question was fairly severe–in that I felt slighted, having never received an invitation. I know this because I have been granted a sensory gift. I can hear a mail truck from at least 4 miles away and ever since childhood, the shutting of the mailbox door causing me to spring into action! So, as the family’s snail-mail gatekeeper, I know for a fact that a gala invite had never touched down at the old homestead.

Feeling under-appreciated and disgruntled, I attempted to erase every mental fragment of this particular organization from my mind. But then…

It was brought to my attention that printed invitations had neither been printed or mailed. All correspondence had been done through e-mail! 

B-Z-Z-Z-Z!(ear-splitting wail of the marketing communications penalty buzzer)

Lets be completely serious. Despite being ultra-green and economical, the novelty of electronic messages evaporated several years ago.

My e-mail inbox has a leak so BIG, that six dozen, Hans Brinkers–would not be able to control the flow. 

As I constantly struggle to bring the inbox to ‘E’–even Gary Cooper would fall victim to the speed of my itchy trigger finger as it reaches for the ‘unsubscribe’ button. 


Click. Gone. Next!


In fact, I recently subscribed to a great new service, unroll.me, which bundles all of my non-personal e-mails into one bundle (my Daily Rollup), delivered once a day. 

The service also tracks e-mails that are not yet included in the digital package. For those, I have three choices:

  1. Ad to my Rollup.
  2. Keep in my Inbox.
  3. Unsubscribe.

I can now out-draw Mr. Cooper, with my left mouse hand–even while blind-folded.

Returning to the invitation, there is a very good chance that while trying this trick (opposite hand, vision-impaired), I accidentally unsubscribed from this list–never to be invited again.

So here is what I strongly recommend in terms of event invitations:

  1. Unless you are going to reach out personally to invitees–either eyeball to eyeball or by the telephone, a printed invitation is necessary.
  2. A post card is fine. Just be aware that post cards do tend to receive excessive punishment as they travel through the USPS meat grinder.
  3. In the case of the gala event (as described above), where tickets are a steep $75 each–a modest invitation mailed in an envelope meets the basic requirements of social grace. After all, you don’t expect me to show up in a sleeveless undershirt and cut-offs.
  4. From an inter-family communication standpoint–you can’t thumbtack an e-mail to the family bulletin board. E-mail and refrigerator doors refuse to socialize.

Unless your e-mail list is rock solid, an e-mailed invitation makes a much better sidekick than an invitation super hero. Because, if you are like me, my ‘UNSUBSCRIBE’ trigger finger–very seldom rests. – Doug.


Glad Farm: Book Cover Design

I recently completed the design of a book cover for friend/author, Catherine Marenghi. Catherine’s new book, “Glad Farm”, tells the story of her entrepreneurial parents and the Gladiola farm that they established in the late 1940s. 

You are currently viewing the original design concept directions, as well as the revised concepts, and finally, the finished front cover.

Inspiration for the front cover was partially provided by an antique seed catalog that Catherine discovered in a collection of farm paperwork. The photographs featured in the initial concepts were actually part of the family’s collection. 

For someone longing for spring flowers and the sun that comes with them, this was the perfect fun, creative, and fast moving project. Thank you Catherine. – Doug.

Recent Work: SmartStand™ Retail Display System



EYMER BRAND Laboratories + Think Tank, recently completed a strategic marketing and visual brand building project for in-store display solutions provider, Kokley.

In addition to a new corporate mark, EYMER, copywriter Jim Montgomery (Montgomery Communications) and Jeff Hoffman (Squash House Media)–teamed up to produce a product video for use at a recent retail industry trade show, where the SmartStand was introduced to some of the world’s leading retailers. 

Work is now underway on print collateral as well as online promotional campaigns. – Doug.

Kokley SmartStand Sales Video from doug eymer on Vimeo.

The Kokley SmartStand is an extremely flexible, visual and digital retail display system. This two-minute video, was recently used to introduce the product and the various flexible components, to a retail trade show event. The creative team, working under an extremely streamlined budget, produced the finished product within 3-4 weeks.

Why Yes, Your Honor: Law Firm Holiday Card Captures Top Prize



Just heard some great news from law firm client, Wolf Greenfield. Their 2013 holiday card, recently captured first place in the New England Chapter of the Legal Marketing Association's annual 'YOUR HONOR AWARDS' program.

Working with the Wolf Greenfield team on their holiday card is always a rewarding creative adventure.

Over the years, we have created a fully-functioning advent calendar, an Al Jaffe (of MAD Magazine fame) fold-in, a SNOW-themed mail order catalog and a ‘Better Homes & Gardens’ magazine spoof. All of these, with a (humorous) Intellectual Law Firm theme, running throughout.

If your company is looking for an attention-getting holiday mailer, it is not too early to start planning–especially for those of us in the Northeast, still experiencing winter. The spring/summer mode has yet to kick in! – Doug.



Just heard some great news from law firm client, Wolf Greenfield. Their 2013 holiday card, recently captured first place in the New England Chapter of the Legal Marketing Association's annual 'YOUR HONOR AWARDS' program.

Working with the Wolf Greenfield team on their holiday card is always a rewarding creative adventure.

Over the years, we have created a fully-functioning advent calendar, an Al Jaffe (of MAD Magazine fame) fold-in, a SNOW-themed mail order catalog and a ‘Better Homes & Gardens’ magazine spoof. All of these, with a (humorous) Intellectual Law Firm theme, running throughout.

If your company is looking for an attention-getting holiday mailer, it is not too early to start planning–especially for those of us in the Northeast, still experiencing winter. The spring/summer mode has yet to kick in! – Doug.

Forgetting to Drain The Swamp + Other Lessons of Running a Creative Businesa



As a creative professional, know that at some point, during your professional career (through either your own desire or necessity) you will have the opportunity to “strike out on your own”. These are some lessons that I have learned during my 30 year career.

On Tuesday, I presented this in webinar form, to friends and colleagues from my alma mater, Rochester Institute of Technology, RIT. Enjoy! –Doug.

For All My Block Type Nerd Fans (we know who we are!)


Made Up Mind, the second studio album from the Tedeschi Trucks Band. Thank you Elizabeth Morse! Crank it up loud! – Doug.